Story | 06/30/2023 12:34:33 | 2 min Read time

Luxury goes sustainable – Experts share their insights

The future of luxury is sustainable. What will we desire? How is our relationship with luxury products changing? What kind of cars will we drive? What will happen to raw materials and the weight of the cars? And most importantly: Why does this mean that also the future of mainstream is sustainable?

We asked four experts to share their insight into how luxury is changing and why it matters. Get a sneak peek below and learn more on the video.

 
 

Linda Lisa Maria Turunen, is a research fellow (PhD) at Aalto University and author of the book Interpretations of Luxury Exploring the Consumer Perspective.

“Luxury is something you desire, but isn’t easy to access. When something becomes accessible to everyone, like soap or spices, it no longer holds its luxury value.”
 

Paul De’Ath is a Course leader of product design at Central Saint Martins, University of Arts London. Previously he’s worked in consultancy practice and in-house corporate teams across many business sectors.

“It’s the responsibility of the manufacturer to understand more than what the customers want and to think about what is actually needed. And light weight cars are one of those things.”
 

Matthias Schmidt is an European automotive market analyst. He has 15 years of experience serving the highest-ranking executives and decision-makers in and around the industry.

“Green and sustainable choices have become something to boast about. When you turn up at a golf club in an electronic vehicle it’s no longer frowned upon but seen as a status symbol.”
 

Gerd Unkelbach works at UPM Biochemicals as a director of molecular bioproducts. UPM Biochemicals develops sustainable solutions for textile and car industries.

“People who buy luxury cars are financing the development of new materials. The whole society will benefit as these innovations are implemented in broader market.” 

 
 
 
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